No. 52 Support Cameroon schools; and the latest long trip to Mundemba and beyond.
By Tiiu-Imbi Miller | Newsletter No. 52 May 2014

 

In the last newsletter I asked for suggestions for rewards we could give to crowd funding donors. Thank you very much to those who responded. If anyone has any more ideas I would be very grateful, but please send them in quickly, as I have to get it all sorted before the end of this month. We intend to launch the funding appeal on June 1st. Thank you.

This will be to raise money for at least 6 Cameroon schools where Atanga Wilson and Gaston Bityo will provide environmental education and Inga plots. They have made a start at some of these schools, but we need money so that this can be followed up and extended to the other schools too.

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Atanga Wilson with eager primary school children about to plant out Inga seedlings. We need more money so this work can be followed up and extended to more schools.

For explanation of crowd funding please see the previous newsletter, no. 51, at

http://www.rainforestsaver.org/news/no-51-can-you-give-us-little-help-we-would-appreciate-your-ideas

 

Gaston Bityo’s trip

In early April Gaston made another trip to the Mundemba region because several community leaders there want to try the Inga system. Indeed, another two have recently contacted us. But the trip is a lot longer and harder than you might think from the map. The road from Yaoundé to Kumba is OK, but from there on – see the photo below.

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Road between Kumba and Mundemba/Fabé. Photo Gaston Bityo

 

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Damage to the truck is inevitable, but somehow they manage to get it repaired and on the road again. Photo Gaston Bityo

The trip is made even harder because Gaston’s main nursery, the one that accommodates 10,000 seedlings, is in the South, where he has land in his home village of Bizang. So he has to pick these up before going North. It is therefore good that several nurseries and seed orchards have been or are now being created in that region.

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Map of Cameroon.

 

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Collecting seed pods from Gaston Bityo’s own productive seed orchard at Bizang. Note the long pods dangling down on the trees. Photo Gaston Bityo.

 

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Truck load of seed pods setting off from Bizang. Photo Gaston Bityo.

 

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Some of our co-workers at Kumba. Prof. Tabouguie on the left, Tabangmua Danisius who contacted us very recently on the right, with Gaston himself in the middle.

 

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Atanga Wilson with one of the new farmers he is working with, Agha Suzanne, on her Inga farm.

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Prof. Tabouguie with his Inga seedlings. He provided Gaston with 300 to take on from Kumba.

There is a lot of interest from schools and farmers from many villages in that region. They grow a lot of cocoa and many farmers want the Inga to use as shade trees for cocoa. Inga is excellent for that, as it both gives good shade and fertilizes the soil and it will increase yields. However, we encourage them to use it first for alley cropping to grow their basic food like maize and beans. Cash crops can then be grown after that, for in an uncertain world, with increasing population and climate change, there can be nothing more important than growing the food for the family to eat.

It will take some time before we have made a real impact because even in the tropics trees take some time to grow, and carting up a lot of seeds and seedlings from the South is both hard and expensive. We have made a great start, and believe this will take off on a much bigger scale once the seed orchards that have been planted up there begin to produce, which won’t take all that long.